5 Benefits Of Simplicity

I love things that are simple. By “things” I mean almost everything, from processes and tools to machines, rules and businesses.

Simplicity generates a virtuous chain of situations and benefits that I drew here:

5 Benefits Of Simplicity

Bringing simple solutions and processes that are easy to understand for others and start this virtuous chain is not always easy. It’s actually more complicated than coming up with a complex solution.

Humans tend to add complexity to things, specially in a work environment where it’s frequent to see people thinking that adding complexity will show others that they are actually working. It takes some experience to first be self aware when one is adding unnecessary complexity and then be humble enough to just add what is needed.

Also some people associate simplicity with incompleteness. The simple solutions and things I’m talking about here assume you’re trying to come up with a complete solution, something that includes everything that needs to be included. This is also a place where people tend to add complexity.

I hope this was useful to you. If you think of more benefits of simplicity please leave them in the comments below.

Playing Lean: the board game every entrepreneur or agile practitioner should play

Yesterday at work I had the opportunity to play a board game I had not heard about before: Playing Lean. It was one of the most entertaining days at work I’ve ever had.

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3 Podcasts You Need To Listen To If You Are Into Startups, Entrepreneurship And Technology

After years of not being subscribed to any podcast, I started listening to them again.

Here are some of my favorites. It’s amazing that you can (still) find great content online for free!

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[Book Review] Remote: Office Not Required

Today I finished reading Remote: Office Not Required, by Jason Fried and David Heinemeier Hansson. Jason and David are the founders of 37signals, a company that creates great web applications for collaborating and working. David is also the creator of the ultra popular web framework Ruby on Rails and they both already wrote two books called “Getting Real: The Smarter, Faster, Easier Way to Build a Successful Web Application” and my favorite, “Rework“.

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